Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof David Alais & Prof Bart Anderson (School of Psychology – University of Sydney) – School of Psychology Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof David Alais & Prof Bart Anderson (School of Psychology – University of Sydney) – School of Psychology

Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof David Alais & Prof Bart Anderson (School of Psychology – University of Sydney)

Please join us for a special two-part colloquium, with Laureate talks by two grant winners in our School:

  1. Prof David Alais (ARC Discovery Project, co-CI Prof Frans Verstraten) Title: “Multisensory perception in active observers”. Project Summary: Perception and action are usually studied separately, often under limited, non-ecological conditions. Recent evidence shows both functions are intrinsically linked and mutually influence each other. This project exploits new technologies to study dynamic perception in free-moving observers in real and virtual multisensory environments. The project will establish the mechanisms underlying the perception/action link and reveal how perceptual stability is achieved despite dynamic input that changes with action. It will generate new understanding of how the brain integrates its twin functions of perceiving the multisensory world and acting upon it, and will generate useful knowledge for virtual, remote and robotic applications.
  2. Prof Bart Anderson (ARC Discovery Project) Title: “Emergent cues underlying the perception of shape, colour, and material”. Project Summary: The goal of this project is to identify the information the visual system uses to extract the three-dimensional structure and material composition of objects. This project aims to generate an advanced understanding of the information that supports these perceptual abilities and to advance our understanding how this information is learned from exposure to natural scenes. The findings of this work are expected to benefit our understanding of the human visual system, and to provide insights into the information needed to advance the development of deep neural networks (machine learning) that exploit the same information used by humans to guide our behavior and recognize objects and materials.

 

Tags:

Date

Apr 16 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Category

Organizer

Sophie Ellwood
Email
psychology.research@sydney.edu.au

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