Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof Olivier Piguet & A/Prof Damian Birney (School of Psychology – University of Sydney) – School of Psychology Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof Olivier Piguet & A/Prof Damian Birney (School of Psychology – University of Sydney) – School of Psychology

Psychology Colloquium: Laureate talks by Prof Olivier Piguet & A/Prof Damian Birney (School of Psychology – University of Sydney)

Please join us for a special two-part colloquium, with Laureate talks by two grant winners in our School:

Prof Olivier Piguet

Human hippocampus subregions organisation and associative memory processes.

This proposal will investigate the hippocampus, a highly inter-connected structure containing many subregions. Although considered the memory centre of the brain, we still do not know the exact roles of these subregions during memory processes. Using novel brain neuroimaging acquisition methods and analyses, this project aims to map the internal structure and functions of the hippocampus and its functional networks under different memory conditions and how these functions change with age. The intended outcome of this proposal is to provide the foundations for the first integrated model of human memory and its biological basis and to generate a benchmark against which future development of memory interventions and retraining can be measured.

 

A/Prof Damian Birney

A paradigm shift in understanding cognitive flexibility.

The project aims to model cognitive flexibility as a dynamic process within people that varies across situations and occasions using advanced data analytics. Significance: The project intends to generate new knowledge in intelligence theory using recent advances that overcome known theory-testing limitations that have historically been ignored. Expected Outcomes: An authentic account of cognitive flexibility and a new paradigm for developing and testing models of dynamic change within people. Benefits: Dynamic models are needed to understand authentic problem-solving and cognitive function. The advances benefit research and applied areas where dynamic processes are important, including education, work, and cognitive aging.

 

Please join us on Friday 5th November at 3pm online at: https://uni-sydney.zoom.us/j/81648124363.

Date

Nov 05 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Category

Organizer

Sophie Ellwood
Email
psychology.research@sydney.edu.au

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